Clance McDonald on September 23rd, 2008

One of my site advertisers catawbacoops.com (thats right, this site does cost money to host) is having an anniversary sale on its chicken coop plans. They are selling their coop plans for half price.

a72835fe6f25fd3 Catawba Chicken Coop Plans

These plans look great. To be honest, I have not built from these plans but from what I understand they were designed for people who don’t nessessarily have a lot of experience or fancy tools. They are for everybody.

979e89e33188a97 Catawba Chicken Coop Plans

If you are still deciding on which chicken coop plans to use, check these ones out.

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Clance McDonald on September 21st, 2008

I just found some interesting blog posts on chicken coop plans that I thought ou might be interested in. DIY projects are great fun so here are some other peoples stories.

  • Keeping Chickens and Building Chicken Coops – By the picture of Samantha’s coop maybe she is enjoying her evenings out there with her chickens at the chicken coop. If you’re reading this and haven’t took the plunge to start keeping chickens yet well maybe this will give you an idea …
  • Chicken Coop – Our largest reusable project is our chicken coop. Believe it or not this used to be our kids swing set and club house. The wire is new, as is the largest piece of plywood along the back in the top picture. Paint is new. …
  • Poppa’s Musings · Summer reflections 2: Picnic Table – I built a picnic table during my vacation in August. I hadn’t built anything this involved in quite a while, probably not since the chicken coop over ten years ago. It seemed like this ought to be a pretty straight-forward project, and I spent time looking at plans online until I found a set that I liked.

Let me know what you think about these chicken coop plans and designs.  Better yet, tell me how your own project went and I’ll feature it on this blog.  Just use the Contact Us page.

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Clance McDonald on September 20th, 2008

Your chicken building should always contain a perch. When building your chicken coop the perch should be made like a ladder, sloping back to the wall and with enough space between each perch to keep the chickens roosting above from pooing on the chickens on the bottom rack. You can put the bottom perch any distance from the floor, two feet or so. Make sure there is plenty of room for the birds to roost without being too crowded.

You can hang your waterer and feeder from your rafters and that will keep them from pooing in the water and feed, plus they can not dig out all the feed to get to the stuff they like best. Most chickens like things like watermelon rind and veggies too, so we always gave those to our birds as a treat, they will pretty much peck a rind till you could read the paper thru it!

If you have a lot of chickens, you may want to buy lice dust just in case wild birds give them lice, that’s a mess to get rid of and the lice will get on humans also.

Oyster shell for grit and calcium and a good chicken feed is about all you need for feed. They love green grass also, so if you have them in a lot where there is none, you can take grass clippings, ONLY FRESH ones , and give them those too as a treat.

Chickens need a safe place from predators so make sure nothing can get into your chicken coop. Even a 2 inch hole will let rats in and we lost some chickens to raccoons who found a 4 inch hole in the floor, still have no idea how on earth the raccoon got thru the hole , but he did!

Good luck with your chickens and your chicken coop plans, fresh eggs are great!

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Clance McDonald on September 11th, 2008

I found this Q&A on Yahoo Answers and thought it was great information that would certainly help others with their own chicken coop plans. Read the comments for further advice on fox barriers for your chicken building.

 

Question:
We are planning to build a chicken coop and run and note that it is recommended to place a solid barrier below ground level to prevent foxes and other predators from digging their way in. How far below ground level should the solid fox barrier be? ie how deep might they dig? Should we also place a chicken wire roof over the run as well or is that not necessary?

 

Answer:
I have chickens. I have a building with a 8 x 12 foot coop inside, with a small door(a piece of plywood on a rope than slides up and down to open and close it) to an outdoor run. The run is made from an old dog kennel(chain link fence). We have fox and coyote around here, and have never had anything try to dig under the fence. If you really are concerned about it, I would say two feet deep would be more than enough. The other option is just to be sure they are closed up inside each night. I do let the hens free range sometimes, and last summer I forgot to close them in at night, and they went out early the next morning and six were eaten by the coyotes!! We had some pheasant netting so we did cover the outside coop with it, but I am not sure that was really necessary either. Most people dont put anything over the tops of their runs around here(Minnesota, USA). Good luck, chickens are fun!!

 

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Clance McDonald on September 8th, 2008

This funny youtube video just goes to show that chickens really do like to nest and feel safe whilst doing so. Remember to add nesting boxes when working on your chicken coop plans. Chickens generally like these nests to be dark and from the looks of the chicken building her nest in this video, nice and cozy too.

Duration : 0:1:22

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